Passing and Receiving # 1

Circle Drill 1

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Description

What makes these different from most other drills is the “chaos” effect where no player can be certain to receive the ball but all must be ready in case they do. Relate this to a match and the desire of every coach to expect every member of his team to all want the ball. Encourage as much one touch passing as possible.
A starts with the ball, moves forward and passes across the area to B. Player B returns a first time pass to A who has followed his original pass. A now has a choice of playing to C or D, who must both make themselves available. Whoever is selected takes the ball forward and repeats the pattern somewhere else.
Numerous coaching opportunities now arise. The weight of pass from A to B and then back to A, the angle of support of C and D, as well as the lay off from A to set C or D on their way. Not to be forgotten is the fact that both C and D needed to be involved even though only one of them would actually receive the ball. Ideally one touch play between this group is the target but of course initially it may not be possible every time. As the coach help each player develop an appreciation of the type of pass required in each situation.

Circle Drill #2
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Where possible, if numbers and ability allow, introduce a second ball. Again this will promote a need to be aware of what is happening through the necessity to know where both balls are, and the desire to keep them apart.
For example, if A and B have exchanged passes then C and D need to be aware of where NOT to pass if they receive the ball from A. The second ball is being passed between E and F with G or H next to be involved so obviously this is a part of the circle to play away from.
In the diagram above, if B were to receive the ball directing his next pass away from the other ball would be a priority.
Player interchange is an integral part of this work and there are a number of possibilities when it comes to the rotation of players on the outside of the CIRCLE.

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